Covid responses and the threat to Higher Education

A recording of this event is now available below:

The idea for the session came about as a response to the shocking redundancies in Leicester earlier this year but also from an age of weariness in the face of managerial control in HE. We felt it was time associations worked more closely with unions in pushing back against these trends. To that end, some of the main political economy associations across Europe agreed to host the session on their websites and to distribute its details to their members. We hope that this will feed out further and encourage broader discussion on the kind of education we all want today.

COVID responses and the managerial threat to Higher Education

Thursday, 8th July, 16.00 London time

CPERN, in collaboration with EAEPE, SASE, ESA CPERN, BISA IPEG, and IIPPE are hosting a discussion with Henry Giroux, Laura Horn and Sam Dallyn. This will be followed by 20 minutes of Q&A.

We aim to raise awareness and solidarity for colleagues under pressure from university managers who are using COVID to mainstream their economics and management programmes and to worsen their employment relations.

-Charlie Dannreuther (Leeds University, convener)
-Henry Giroux (McMaster University, speaking about critical pedagogy)
-Laura Horn (Roskilde University, speaking for critical political economy in Denmark)
-Sam Dallyn (Leicester Business School, speaking about the strike)

Join the event via this link: https://eu.bbcollab.com/collab/ui/session/guest/fcdbc1d7ab2a467caec23118b467ee85

COVID responses and the threat to Higher Education

The idea for the session came about as a response to a number of developments – including the redundancies in Leicester earlier this year and the moves in Denmark to undermine critical research – but also from an age of weariness in the face of managerial control in HE. It is time associations worked more closely with unions in pushing back against these trends. To that end, some of the main political economy associations across Europe have agreed to host the session on their websites and to distribute its details to their members. We hope that this will feed out further and encourage broader discussion on the kind of education we all want today.

The speakers

Henry Giroux has been making powerful arguments against the encroachment of neo liberal practices in universities for many years, so it is very fitting that he begins our discussion. His links of higher education with neoliberalism and contemporary fascism and the role critical teaching plays in creating alternatives (att.) have been developed in over 100 books.

Laura Horn has been recently speaking out on national TV in Denmark against political attacks against critical scholars. She writes on neoliberalism in Europe, runs an annual Repoliticising Capitalism Summer School in Roskilde and is a leading figure in the Euro memo campaigning group.

Sam Dallyn speaks as someone present in Leicester on managerial practices and the challenges to critical thinking. He has also written on post capitalism, the role of the public intellectual and resistance to bureaucratic control.

Thursday, 8th July, 16.00 London time

Climate Catastrophe and the Capitalist State

The next CPERN workshop in the series: A Critical Political Economy of Covid Capitalism (every final Thursday of the month)

Fracking: how the police response is threatening the right to protest

Climate Catastrophe and the Capitalist State

Thursday, 24 June 4pm (British Summer Time)/5pm (Central European Summer Time)

**NOTE SLIGHTLY CHANGED TIME TO USUAL**

commentators:

Andrea Brock (University of Sussex)
Oscar Berglund (University of Bristol)
Madelaine Moore (Bielefeld University)

Register here: https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUsd-Gpqj4vGdSfb-omMhyV_Pfi5b_F9Fuf

Text: Andrea Brock, 2020, ‘Frack off’: Towards an anarchist political ecology critique of corporate and state responses to anti-fracking resistance in the UK, Political Geographyhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0962629819301192

Format (derived from our highly successful project – the Critical European Studies workshop):

In order to foster a constructive debate, each workshop starts with a brief introduction of the theme and the pre-selected text used to kick-start the discussion followed by a few select expert commentators discussing and enhancing the perspectives developed in the core text from the angle of their own research/activism and in the context of current struggles. This is followed by a workshop-type discussion instead of the conference-style Q&A, in order to collectively advance knowledge, understanding and analysis of the themes raised in the workshop and develop shared ideas for action.

Initial contributions are limited to 5 minutes per commentator.

Text: Andrea Brock, 2020, ‘Frack off’: Towards an anarchist political ecology critique of corporate and state responses to anti-fracking resistance in the UK, Political Geographyhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0962629819301192

commentators:

Andrea Brock (University of Sussex)
Oscar Berglund (University of Bristol)
Madelaine Moore (Bielefeld University)

We look forward to seeing you there!

Comparing (covid) capitalisms: forefronting crises, conflicts and contradictions in critical political economy

The next CPERN workshop in the series: A Critical Political Economy of Covid Capitalism (every final Thursday of the month, 5pm (British Summer Time)/6pm (Central European Summer Time)

Nurses allege understaffing and a lack of adequate COVID-19 protections –  Daily News

Comparing (covid) capitalisms: forefronting crises, conflicts and contradictions in critical political economy

Thursday, 27 May 5pm (British Summer Time)/6pm (Central European Summer Time)

commentators:

Ian Bruff (University of Manchester)
Reecia Orzeck (Illinois State University)
Jana Bacevic (Durham University)

Register here: https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcof-2uqz8uE9Y4Esc13KYENpdjnWFo10Qx

Text: Ian Bruff (2021) ‘The politics of comparing capitalisms’, Environment and Planning A: Economy and Spacehttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0308518X21997125

Format (derived from our highly successful project – the Critical European Studies workshop):

In order to foster a constructive debate, each workshop starts with a brief introduction of the theme and the pre-selected text used to kick-start the discussion followed by a few select expert commentators discussing and enhancing the perspectives developed in the core text from the angle of their own research/activism and in the context of current struggles. This is followed by a workshop-type discussion instead of the conference-style Q&A, in order to collectively advance knowledge, understanding and analysis of the themes raised in the workshop and develop shared ideas for action.

Initial contributions are limited to 5 minutes per commentator.

Text: Ian Bruff (2021) ‘The politics of comparing capitalisms’, Environment and Planning A: Economy and Spacehttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0308518X21997125

commentators:

Ian Bruff (University of Manchester)
Reecia Orzeck (Illinois State University)
Jana Bacevic (Durham University)

We look forward to seeing you there!

Neoliberal transformations and the state, before and after Covid

The next CPERN workshop in the series: A Critical Political Economy of Covid Capitalism (every final Thursday of the month, 5pm (British Summer Time)/6pm (Central European Summer Time)

Neoliberal Transformations of the Italian State: Understanding the Roots of  the Crises - 9781786614735

Neoliberal transformations and the state, before and after Covid

Thursday, 29 April 5pm (British Summer Time)/6pm (Central European Summer Time)

commentators:

Adriano Cozzolino (University of Campania “L. VanvitellI”)
Davide Monaco (University of Manchester)
Aleksandra Piletić (University of Amsterdam)

Register here (incl. link to the text): https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIpc-qrrD4tGtN5BHBbQvmBvZp5RjZx__SM

Format (derived from our highly successful project – the Critical European Studies workshop):

In order to foster a constructive debate, each workshop starts with a brief introduction of the theme and the pre-selected text used to kick-start the discussion followed by a few select expert commentators discussing and enhancing the perspectives developed in the core text from the angle of their own research/activism and in the context of current struggles. This is followed by a workshop-type discussion instead of the conference-style Q&A, in order to collectively advance knowledge, understanding and analysis of the themes raised in the workshop and develop shared ideas for action.

Initial contributions are limited to 5 minutes per commentator.

Text: Adriano Cozzolino, 2021, Neoliberal Transformations of the Italian State: Understanding the Roots of the Crises.

commentators:

Adriano Cozzolino (University of Campania “L. VanvitellI”)
Davide Monaco (University of Manchester)
Aleksandra Piletić (University of Amsterdam)

We look forward to seeing you there!

A critical political economy of disruption and resistance

The next CPERN workshop in the series: A Critical Political Economy of Covid Capitalism (every final Thursday of the month, 5pm GMT)

People take part in a march against the government of Colombian President Ivan Duque during a national strike, in Cali on November 27, 2019.

A critical political economy of disruption and resistance

Thursday, 25 March 5pm (GMT)/6pm (CET)

commentators:

Alke Jenss (Arnold-Bergstraesser-Institut)
Clemence Fourton (Sciences Po Lille)
Nikolai Huke (University of Kiel)
Alona Lyasheva (Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv)

Register here: https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwvce2tpzouG910oh1wTvIx0gPWUaAOOUKW  

Format (derived from our highly successful project – the Critical European Studies workshop):

In order to foster a constructive debate, each workshop starts with a brief introduction of the theme and the pre-selected text used to kick-start the discussion followed by a few select expert commentators discussing and enhancing the perspectives developed in the core text from the angle of their own research/activism and in the context of current struggles. This is followed by a workshop-type discussion instead of the conference-style Q&A, in order to collectively advance knowledge, understanding and analysis of the themes raised in the workshop and develop shared ideas for action.

Initial contributions are limited to 5 minutes per commentator.

Text:

Alke Jenss (2021) ‘Disrupting the Rhythms of Violence: Anti‐port Protests in the City of Buenaventura’, Global Policy. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1758-5899.12878

commentators:

Alke Jenss (Arnold-Bergstraesser-Institut)
Clemence Fourton (Sciences Po Lille)
Nikolai Huke (University of Kiel)
Alona Lyasheva (Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv)

We look forward to seeing you there!

A critical political economy of the European Union under covid capitalism

The next CPERN workshop in the series: A Critical Political Economy of Covid Capitalism (every final Thursday of the month, 5pm GMT)

Image result for european union covid

A critical political economy of the European Union under covid capitalism

Thursday, 25 February 5pm (GMT)/6pm (CET)

commentators:

Laura Horn (Roskilde University)

Muireann O’Dwyer (University of St. Andrews)

Etienne Schneider (University Vienna)

Register here:https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEqf-mrqj0iHtWsMc_lSkwVXeZWuh124ii- 

Format (derived from our highly successful project – the Critical European Studies workshop):

In order to foster a constructive debate, each workshop starts with a brief introduction of the theme and the pre-selected text used to kick-start the discussion followed by a few select expert commentators discussing and enhancing the perspectives developed in the core text from the angle of their own research/activism and in the context of current struggles. This is followed by a workshop-type discussion instead of the conference-style Q&A, in order to collectively advance knowledge, understanding and analysis of the themes raised in the workshop and develop shared ideas for action.

Initial contributions are limited to 5 minutes per commentator.

Text: Angela Wigger and Laura Horn, 2021, ‘Lobbying in the EU: How Much Power for Big Business? Still influential after all these years – corporate interests in the EU’, in H. Zimmerman and A. Dur (eds), Key Controversies in European Integration 3e, (Palgrave).

commentators:

Laura Horn (Roskilde University)

Muireann O’Dwyer (University of St. Andrews)

Etienne Schneider (University Vienna)

We look forward to seeing you there!

CPERN statement on UK HE redundancies

We in the Critical Political Economy Research Network note the ongoing attempts to use the Covid-19 pandemic as an opportunity by callous University managers seeking to cut costs and further undermine the UK higher education system.

Job insecurity and under-funding for those who work in universities clearly undermines the invaluable research and education which they do. To treat a pandemic as an opportunity to provide less support for these social necessities is, we agree, despicable and impossible to fathom.

We are obviously especially concerned at rumoured moves to ‘defund’ or ‘move away from’ specific research areas that are transversal to disciplines, such as political economy

CPERN opposes redundancies for anyone working in higher education, whether for research reasons or other restructuring reasons.

We are living through what will undoubtedly be the biggest change to our national and global political economies within living memory. Public and private debt, trading relations, investment, public expenditure, environmental and labour market regulation, health care, work-life balance, housing, employment relations, global economic management, monetary policy, technological change, and global sustainable development, are each fundamental to political economy, to name just a few of our areas of study. Knowledge in each of these areas will be crucial to our collective, society-wide and planetary wellbeing in the years ahead.

We wonder which of these crucial areas of research and knowledge university managers seek to defund or move away from? And why? Based on which rationalisation?

Only an ill-considered process of mismanagement could result in the kinds of poor decisions that university managers seem determined to make, with seemingly no awareness of their universally negative results. This is clearly yet another symptom of the decline of the UK’s neoliberal and morally-bankrupt model of political economy, which is in urgent need of more study and transformation, rather than its de-funding.

Any recovery from this pandemic will also require a vibrant Critical Political Economy. It is on this goal that we as a network focus.

CPERN Board
2 February 2021